Save Your Historic Neighborhood

Yesterday, I wrote about the APNA board meeting where the propose Baffert project and removal of the property from our HPZ was extensively discussed. I want to follow up on the subject.

Bill Duffy, Chair of our historic board (APHZAB), recently posted an excellent email to our listserv on the subject. Most of it is quoted here: Continue reading “Save Your Historic Neighborhood”

APNA Concerned About Baffert Project

The most important discussions of the meeting were regarding the proposed Baffert project at Five Points. While some have expressed concern about the height of the proposed building or its impact on the on-street parking situation, those are not the most important problems with this proposal.  The mechanism being used by the developer and the Tucson planning department is to remove the project’s lot from our Historic Preservation Zone. The precedent created is a threat to the historic character of our entire neighborhood and others across the city. Continue reading “APNA Concerned About Baffert Project”

A Busy Evening at APHZAB

The November APHZAB meeting was a little different than usual because it opened with a presentation by Michael Taku, lead planner in the PDSD historic office. A central message was that the board has a recommending role and is not a final decision maker. The PDSD director has the final say subject to appeal to Mayor and Council. He also asked for feedback from the board to streamline the review process. Streamlining will be easier said than done because of the many obstacles: a split building- historic permit process, shortage of staff, staff inexperience and a culture that does not seem to value customer service. I will remain a hopeful skeptic until I see concrete improvements. Continue reading “A Busy Evening at APHZAB”

Rezoning Closer to Home

Here is another rezoning issue much closer to home. Again, Steve K has done a great job breaking down the subject into understandable pieces. The key element here is the lack of flexibility of HPZ rules concerning maximum height of structures. There has been considerable discussion within our two boards, APNA and APHZAB. Various board members have different views on the matter, but most seem to feel that some form of compromise is needed. Please read through Steve’s piece carefully, then decide how you feel about the issue. Our boards need your input.  Continue reading “Rezoning Closer to Home”

More About Fry’s – Houghton and 22nd

This rather lengthy piece  was taken from Steve Kozachik’s latest newsletter. You may recall my earlier piece on the subject based on my attendance at a public hearing. Steve’s interest is the same as mine, the casual way that city government treats its legal and ethical obligations to our communities. The motivation is economic with our local politicians prioritising economic growth and tax revenue over the environment and community wellbeing. With all of the economic activity near the city center, we should expect similar problems sooner or later. There is a lot of detail here but Steve laid out the issues better than I did.  Continue reading “More About Fry’s – Houghton and 22nd”

Two Neighborhood Elections

At the last APNA meeting (11/14), two important neighborhood organizations held elections to fill positions on their boards of directors. Outside of the scheduled APNA meeting, the historic board (APHZAB) elected three individuals by acclamation. Here are their names (and their category of membership): Michael Means (property owner), Steve Grede and Patrick O’brien (both are subject matter experts). They will join the board on the approval of Mayor and Council, expected within a month. The board will elect its officers at the next meeting. Continue reading “Two Neighborhood Elections”

Home Tour Recap

home-tour-logo-e1508457997230Home tour organizer, Anne Cooper, has published a summary of  the 2017 tour. There were 59 homeowners and supporting volunteers who made the tour possible. She estimates that there were 350 paid ticket sales but there are donations still coming in. If you would like to donate too, just go to https://ArmoryParkTucson.org/donate/. As of 11/15, total revenue amounted to $7,012. From that total, expenses (about $500) must be deducted. Of the final net amount, 75% will be donated to Neighbors Feeding Neighbors.

The revenue and support of a worthy cause are important but for me not the most important benefit of the tour. Bringing so many neighbors together to work for a common cause and reminding all of our historic heritage is the greatest reward. All of us who opened our homes, volunteered as supporters or spruced up our sidewalks were enriched by the experience of working with our neighbors.

Armory Park is such a great place to live.